Children with Autism Have a Disconnect Between What They Hear and What They See

The latest from Fox News.com:

The world for children with autism may resemble watching a movie with the audio out of sync. New research shows these children have trouble putting together what they see with what they hear, and that these deficits may underlie their speech and communication problems.

I don’t know about you but this explains so much about why my kids have communications issues. We know Nathan has issues with his eyesight and has problems processing information. At 10-years of age, Peter is just now showing a curiosity about the world around him by asking questionsĀ  such as “Where are you going?”, “When are you coming back?”, and “What is that?”

If audio and video are out of sync, it would explain the problems they have understanding what is said and how they process information they hear.

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Whoo-hoo! New Kindle, Here I Come!

I was cleaning the desk in the house (the same desk my dad and I custom-built so I could write comfortably but that I currently don’t use because Peter broke the chair) and found the paperwork for a warranty I purchased for my Kindle. I had completely forgotten that I had bought a warranty! How I could forget that I bought one is beyond me right now–after having had two Kindles broken and replaced, you would think it would be automatic to buy a warranty.

But I have one and I can get a new Kindle (or at least a suitably appropriate replacement)!

My Kindle, Part 2

Well, it happened– again. One of my kids grabbed my Kindle when I thought it was safe in the car, under my purse, and out of the way. While driving, Nathan snatched it, looked at it during the car ride and then, apparently, laid it down on the floor. Next thing I know, after reaching our destination, and backing my seat up over the Kindle (!),I was looking at a broken Kindle (again!).

It still works–kind of– but the screen has broken pixels in the corner and lines running down the front. Oh, joy!

Technology and kids (with or without autism) is like trying to mix oil and water.